TheUluruStatementRED

Unfinished Business

Australian Historical Association Annual Conference
29 Nov - 02 Dec 2021

Online Event hosted by UNSW Sydney

The Uluru Statement, Black Lives Matter protests, toppled statues and the Whitlam Dismissal are just a few of many examples of history’s unfinished business in the contemporary world. On the eve of its 40th anniversary, the Australian Historical Association Conference returns to the University of New South Wales where it held its first conference in 1982 and invites papers exploring the unfinished business of history.

This conference is proudly supported by the School of Humanities & Languages and the Faculty of Arts, Design & Architecture, UNSW Sydney.

Submissions to the 2021 AHA Conference have now closed. If you've yet to receive a confirmation of your panel or individual submission, please get in touch at ahaconference2021@gmail.com.

Our Major Sponsors

UNSW Sydney
State Library NSW
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Speakers
Sponsored by the School of Humanities & Languages, UNSW Sydney

Keynote

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Shino Konishi

University of Western Australia

Shino Konishi is an Aboriginal historian, and descends from the Yawuru people of Broome, Western Australia. She is an Associate Professor in the Institute for the Humanities and Social Sciences at the Australian Catholic University, and her research interests include histories of exploration, cross-cultural encounter, and collecting practices. Shino currently leads an ARC project on Indigenous biography, in collaboration with the Australian Dictionary of Biography.

Alison Bashford

Alison Bashford

UNSW Sydney

Alison Bashford FBA FAHA is Laureate Professor of History at UNSW, and Director of the Laureate Centre for History & Population, and Honorary Fellow, Jesus College, Cambridge. Previously she was Vere Harmsworth Professor of Imperial and Naval History at the University of Cambridge. Alison Bashford’s longstanding work on population appears in two books, Global Population: History, Geopolitics and Life on Earth (Columbia 2014) and The New Worlds of Thomas Robert Malthus (Princeton, 2016) with Joyce E. Chaplin. 

Plenary

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Professor Megan Davis

Professor Megan Davis is Pro Vice-Chancellor Indigenous and Balnaves Professor of Constitutional Law at UNSW. She is Acting Commissioner of the NSW Land and Environment Court and member of the United Nations Human Rights Council’s Expert Mechanism on the Rights of Indigenous peoples.

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Dr Crystal McKinnon

Dr Crystal McKinnon is an Amangu woman from the Yamatji Nation who lives and works on Kulin Nations country. She is a historian and a critical Indigenous studies scholar, who is currently working at RMIT as a Vice Chancellor’s Indigenous Research Fellow in the Social and Global Studies Centre.

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Alison Whittaker

Alison Whittaker, a Gomeroi legal scholar and author, is Senior Researcher at the Jumbunna Institute at UTS and a Scientia PhD candidate at UNSW. Alison was a Fulbright and Roberta Sykes scholar at Harvard Law School, 2017-2018. Her second book, BLAKWORK, was released with Magabala Books in September 2018.

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Osca Monaghan

Osca Monaghan is a non-binary, mixed-race, Guugu Yimithirr lawyer with the Aboriginal Legal Service. They are a criminal defence lawyer, but their research interests are rooted primarily in decolonial and Indigenous legal and political thought.

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The Uluru Statement from the Heart

At its 2019 Annual meeting, the AHA endorsed the Uluru Statement from the Heart. In 2021, we honour that endorsement by placing this beautiful artwork by Rene Kulitja, Christine Brumby, Charmaine Kulitja and Happy Reid at the centre of our conference. We do so with the permission of the Uluru Statement from the Heart. The Australian government’s reluctance to embrace the statement is our most important Unfinished Business. Please follow the link to learn about and support the cause.